Vehicle Carbon monoxide leak in car leads to blackouts and accident

A vehicle carbon monoxide leak in a vehicle caused the kids in the car to blackout and sideswipe a bus on their way to school in Howell, MI, according to ABC 7 WXYZ Detroit.

The source of the carbon monoxide was a leaky muffler and a hole in the firewall. The kids said they felt dizzy and blacked out, but they didn’t know why.

The police realized that the kids were not okay, and called Livingston County EMS. But the kids say that they were not taken to the hospital.

The survivors of the vehicle carbon monoxide leak were taken to school by a security guard. They had to leave school to go to the hospital. One of the boys left in a wheelchair.

Hospital records for vehicle carbon monoxide leak show that all of the boys had carbon monoxide poisoning. Firefighters tested the vehicle and also found elevated levels of carbon monoxide.

The driver’s father said that it was a mistake to not take them to the hospital right away. Carboxyhemoglobin levels go down when the victims are exposed to fresh air, so the levels would have gone down between the time of exposure and being taken to the hospital.

Part of the prehospital protocol involves taking the carboxyhemoglobin levels and also providing oxygen therapy as soon as possible.

The most effective treatment once at the hospital is putting the victim in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber, which has twice the pressure of normal oxygen. This kind of treatment decreases the likelihood of cognitive sequelae at six weeks.

One study looked at the difference between less severe and more severe carbon monoxide poisoning. It found that the incidence of cognitive sequelae did not differ at any time. The study found that cognitive sequelae is common and may be independent of poisoning severity.

The blackouts that the boys say they experienced vehicle carbon monoxide leak is indicative of a more severe carbon monoxide poisoning. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment is often recommended for acute CO poisoning, especially when the patients have lost consciousness or more severe poisoning.

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